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02Jul


Are you thinking about putting your property on the market, but aren’t sure when or how? We’ve identified some of the best times to think seriously about selling your property.







1. Your family needs more space. No matter if your family is growing or if the people in your house are growing restless, it’s time to consider a change.


2. Look to the seasons. The autumn and spring are known for being good times to sell your property.


3. You’re not excited to go home at the end of the day. Can you rest, relax and feel safe in your home? It should be a place where you feel comfortable, and anything less should have you looking elsewhere.


4. The local property market is flourishing. Speak to your local agent and look around your neighbourhood. More activity means it is a better time to sell.


5. You’re considering buying a new property. If you’re thinking of moving house, put your own home on the market first.


26Jun


The home you purchase isn’t always your dream property, but you can turn your property into the home of your dreams with a few quick fixes. Here are some tips to upgrade your home for less.  




1. Paint your kitchen cabinets

Freshly painted cabinets give the kitchen an update without the cost of a full renovation. Choose light colours to brighten the space. 



2. Add mirrors 


Mirrors can make any space seem larger and are an easy way to ‘open up’ a room.



3. Invest in landscaping 


Consider adding some landscaping to the front of your property. A tree or two works well in a more rural environment, and never underestimate the power of a few potted plants in an urban home. 



4. Add wooden floors


Wall-to-wall carpet is no longer a popular choice, as homeowners now prefer wooden floors that they can choose to put a rug on. Consider vinyl flooring in a wooden pattern to get reclaimed wooden floors for less. 



5. Freshen the front door


First impressions count, so choose a front door in a neutral glossy shade or pick a bright colour with personality. 



Do you want to find a home to spruce up? Contact your us today.


25Jun


Many people forget the first impression comes from the garden. Watch the video to get ideas and tips to help sell your home this summer, as well as make your garden a more enjoyable place to be. 




1. Decluttering the garden can add value. Always start with tidying and give your lawn a fresh mow and tidy up any weather damage before a viewing. 


2. Add some seasonal colour, like plant pots filled with flowers. This will add perceived value.


3. Start in the front garden, because this is where your potential buyer will start. The first impression counts. 


4. Add a key selling point, like a summer house, play park or a jacuzzi if you want to turn your garden into a fantastic reason to buy the house. This requires major investment, but it could secure your sale. 


5. If you’re looking to spend less, don’t underestimate the impact of a coat of paint on fences and sheds. 


6. Style your garden with furniture. You wouldn’t show a room to a potential buyer without any furniture in it, so why show a garden without a table and chairs on the decking or patio?


7. If your home is overlooked, it’s a good idea to give the idea of privacy to the garden. If it isn’t too expensive, add hedges or trees in key spots. 


Are you looking for a new home with a beautiful garden? Contact us today on 01364 652652 


05May



So you’ve completed on your new home and can’t wait to move. You’ve even started thinking about how to decorate. There’s one thing you might have forgotten, though: you’ve got to move out of your home first. Between packing your things and preparing for your first night in a new home, moving house can seem overwhelming. However, moving from one property to another doesn’t have to be stressful. Read our tips to remove the stress from your moving experience. 


1. Stay organised 


As with any daunting task, staying organised is key. Pack by room and decide when and how you will organise your things. Once you’ve assigned items to labelled boxes, consider the moving van. How will the boxes go inside? Will you need to take multiple trips? Once you’ve worked these things out, you’ll have a plan for your moving day which should give you peace of mind. 


2. Pack early


There’s nothing worse than having a moving van booked and realising that you’ll need to pack all night to be ready. Start packing as soon as you can. Choose non-essential items first (decorations, etc.), and pack your essentials like furniture and cutlery the week of the move. 


3. Take your time


When you’re moving house, be sure to allot more time than you actually need. Feeling rushed will make your stress levels skyrocket, so being slow and methodical is the best way to combat moving worry. Extra time allows you to be more careful when you’re packing and unpacking, and it also takes into account the inevitable moving day setbacks. 


4. Be flexible


There are sure to be bumps in the road when you’re moving house, so remind yourself to stay flexible. Having a plan is a great way to stay organised, but don’t be afraid to deviate from it when circumstances require. 


5. Have a backup plan


When you’re planning your move, take a small amount of time to think about the things that could go wrong and write them down. Once you’ve got your list, think of ways that you could overcome these problems. A backup plan will help take stress out of your move, because you’ve already thought of potential solutions. 


6. Enlist help


Moving house is a huge task, and it becomes even bigger when you have to do it all yourself. Ask for help from your friends and family (most of them will be willing to lend a hand for a few slices of pizza) to take the pressure off. You’ll be finished much faster, and the more people that are involved, the easier moving to your new home will be. 


7. Say goodbye


You’ve lived in your old property for some time, so give yourself a moment to think about all the good memories you associate with the space. If you’re in the mood to entertain (and you haven’t packed all the plates and glasses), have a party and invite your friends to say goodbye to your old home in style. 


8. Take care of yourself


Purchasing a new property and moving into it can be extremely draining, so be careful to take care of yourself throughout the process. A healthy diet and plenty of exercise can help take the edge off your moving stress. Taking care of yourself also means that you deserve a treat every now and then, so consider a takeaway on your first night in the new home to reward yourself for all your hard work!


Are you looking for your dream home? For more help call us todaye - 01364 652652.




25Apr

House Buying Jargon Explained


When it comes to buying a house, there can be a lot to get your head around; lengthy contracts, difficult to read paperwork, not to mention the confusing language – what does it all mean?

Here is a list of common housing terms that will help you beat the jargon.

Buyer: that’s you!

Vendor: this is another term for the seller.

Freehold: a type of occupancy which means you own the building and the land it sits on.

Leasehold: this is where you own the property but not the land it is built on – for example, you may own a flat, but not the building it sits in. Our guide to buying a leasehold property tells you everything you need to know before you sign on the dotted line.

Bridging loan: a temporary short-term loan which enables a buyer to purchase a property before selling their existing property.

Equity: equity, or capital, represents the amount of money a homeowner has put into a property. This value is built up over time as the owner pays off the mortgage and the market value of the property appreciates.

Building survey: a report into the physical state of the property, this is also sometimes referred to as a full structural survey.

Covenant: a covenant is a provision or promise that has been written into a deed which may affect or limit the use of the property or land. There are two different types of covenant, positive and restrictive. A positive covenant is an obligation which requires some form of action (such as maintain a fence or wall), whereas a restrictive covenant limits or prevents the use of land in a specified way.

Easement: an easement is the right of one landowner to make use of another nearby piece of land for the benefit of his own land, for example, a private right of way.

Chain: a chain is formed when several property sales and purchases are inter-dependent. A chain can be complicated but a good estate agent will be able to help keep it moving.

EPC: an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) shows the efficiency of a property and gives an indication of how much the energy bills will cost. It is displayed as two graphs – the energy efficiency, and the environmental impact of the property. Each is graded from A (the best) to G (the worst).

Under offer: if a property is under offer it means that the seller has accepted an offer from the buyer but the contracts have not yet been exchanged.

Exchange of contracts: the point where both parties are committed to the transaction; both the buyer and seller can walk away at any point before the contracts have been exchanged.

Completion date: when the transaction is complete and ownership of the property passes from the seller to the buyer. Normally, the vendor’s solicitor will ask the estate agent to release the keys to the buyer at this time.

Snagging: snagging is where the developer of new build properties touches up paintwork, adjusts appliances and fixes any other faults within the property. A snagging survey is usually completed prior to the buyer moving in, in order to spot minor cosmetic issues and check the quality of workmanship.

Stamp Duty: a lump-sum tax that anyone buying a property or land over a certain price in England, Northern Ireland and Wales must pay. The current threshold for residential properties is £125,000 and £150,000 for non-residential land and properties, however the rate you pay will vary depending on the overall purchase price. Read our Stamp Duty guide for more information.

Land Transaction Tax: the tax that will replace Stamp Duty in Wales from April 2018. The proposed tax rates and bands were announced in October 2017.

Land & Building Transaction Tax: the tax you pay when purchasing land or property in Scotland. The current threshold is £145,000 for residential properties and £150,000 for non-residential land and properties, however the rate payable is subject to the total purchase cost. Read our Stamp Duty guide for more information.

Base rate: the interest rate which is set by the Bank of England for lending to other banks. It is generally used as a benchmark for the interest rates banks charge when lending money to customers.

Fixed rate mortgage: with a fixed rate mortgage, you pay a set rate of interest on your mortgage for a fixed period, so you know exactly what you'll be paying each month.

Tracker mortgage: this is a mortgage with an interest rate linked to the Bank of England rate, or another base rate. The interest rate will go up and down depending on this rate, irrespective of the mortgage lender.

Variable rate mortgage: with a variable rate mortgage, the interest rate can change at any time. They are partly influenced by the Bank of England base rate but other factors come into play as well. The interest rate you pay on a variable rate mortgage can change even without base rate moving and similarly base rate might come down but your mortgage rate stays the same.


Source: Propertymark


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